PLAYLIST

You are currently browsing the archive for the PLAYLIST category.

There’s that old adage: if a tree falls on the internet and no one’s around to hear it, will anyone read its year-end list? Well, let’s find out! Even though we haven’t written a single post all year, rest assured that we’ve been listening to all kinds of great music, and some of it was even released this very year! And even though we’re a bit rusty, we’ve got some records we want you to know about.

This list is shorter than in years past, but we also feel stronger about each individual record than we have on any previous list, making it that much more fun to compile this thing. Also, this is the first time in 5 years that we both had the exact same record at #1 – so that’s pretty neat.

As always, we don’t pretend to be some great arbiters of fine musical taste. We don’t proclaim that these are the absolute best records released all year. These are just the records we absolutely loved the most. They’re the ones we kept coming back to, the ones that really moved us. They’re the ones we’ll remember when we look back on the last year of human civilization.

 

13. My Head Is An Animal

by Of Monsters And Men

[Universal Republic]

Sometimes it’s enough to just say that I like an album. The ‘why’ hasn’t been very important to me this year. Who’s to say what I find so enjoyable about My Head is an Animal? Male and female lead vocals? The la-la-las of “From Finner”? The hey-heys of “From Finner”? Just the simple fact that they’re Icelandic? Probably all-of-the-above, but I’m not thinking about that. What has mattered to me this year is the staying power of the songs and Of Monsters and Men has been my companion through countless hours of work, driving, cleaning the bathroom, lying aimlessly on the couch, etc. etc. -Logan

mp3: Of Monsters And Men – From Finner

12. The Only Place

by Best Coast

[Mexican Summer]

The Only Place takes all the things I enjoyed about BC’s debut, and improved on them just a bit – making an overall cleaner and crisper record. Not too clean or crisp, mind. That would ruin her… but it’s just enough to make this one a little less niche, while keeping all the hooks and humor that reeled me in to begin with. Per the (adorable) album art, she spends a fair amount of time lauding the Golden State – and being a California ex-patriot myself, I’m pretty much doomed to love her stuff no matter what (most of her rhapsodizing about her home state lines up so seamlessly with my own high-school nostalgia, right down to her covering Blink-182’s “Dammit” in concert – I mean, you can’t get any closer to my 1998 SoCal self than that song). And while the record is ostensibly a love letter to the Golden State, it comes wrapped in the kind of wide-eyed and sincere love of place that can be applied to anywhere you happen to call home, wherever it might be. –Chris

mp3: Best Coast – The Only Place

11. America

by Dan Deacon

[Domino]

Back in August Dan Deacon guest DJ’d on NPR’s All Songs Considered, and I’ll be honest: after listening to that show I was going to love America no matter what it sounded like. The guy is just so infinitely likeable, and for someone who graduated in ‘Electro-acoustic and Computer Music Composition’, he’s remarkably earnest, and refreshingly UN-pretentious. Deacon makes artsy electronic music but with a populace appeal – it’s complex and dense and referential, but it’s also insanely danceable and sometimes arrestingly beautiful (for proof watch THIS). By Deacon’s own admission, America is meant to be listened to in the LP format, with two distinct sides: Side-A contains the kind of noisy/cathartic electro-jams that are Deacon’s bread and butter, while Side B unfolds into a 20-minute symphonic suite employing electronic tools alongside a full orchestras-worth of wood, wind ‘n brass to bring to life Deacon’s expansive panorama of the American landscape. It’s evocative and gorgeous and challenging and it puts Dan Deacon solidly on the short list of artists who are meaningfully fuzzing the line between electronic pop-music and fine art. -Chris

mp3: Dan Deacon – True Thrush

10. Babel

by Mumford & Sons

[Glass Note]

Continuing my list of albums that you can purchase at Target is Mumford & Sons’ Babel. If I had to sum up my love of this album it would be in two hyphenated words: scream-sing. 2012 has been the year of the scream-sing for me. (Need proof? You’ll see those conjoined words again in just a few posts!) My favorite tracks from Babel are also the tracks that, when you sing along, you find the veins in your neck popping out: “Hopeless Wanderer”, “Below My Feet”, and the unbeatable “Ghosts That We Knew.” -Logan

mp3: Mumford & Sons – Hopeless Wanderer

9. Be The Void

by Dr. Dog

[ANTI-]

Right from the foot-stomping sing-a-long of the opening track, it’s clear that on Be The Void, Dr. Dog’s moved back to a more homespun sound than their last few albums, and the result is their most garage-sounding record ever. Be The Void sounds like a bunch of friends who love bands like Pavement and Three Dog Night equally, who got together for a weekend and banged out 11 of the absolute funnest songs they could come up with. These songs have that breathless live quality that make you want to sing loud and hard right along with them, especially on tracks like “Lonesome”, “Heavy Light”, and “Get Away”. I’ve said over and over if I could be in any rock band, it would be Dr. Dog. These guys just make the kind of music that makes the music-maker happy! Say that ten times fast. Then go listen to Be The Void. -Chris

mp3: Dr. Dog – Lonesome

8. There’s No Leaving Now

by The Tallest Man On Earth

[Dead Oceans]

Kristian Matsson’s latest record as The Tallest Man On Earth is my September record – it’s warm and cozy and it’s my relief from the long, hot summer. It sounds like autumn, with its clear, colorful days and crisp, cozy nights. It makes me think of riding bikes on leaf-littered trails and sitting out on high-school bleachers in sweatshirts. It’s not quite as wild and blustery as October yet, or as somber as November will be, but it’s also not without its own kind of tension – Matsson’s reedy voice has always had an inherent drama built into it, like the first harbinger that things are winding down, that this is the beginning of the end. The songs are gorgeous and flighty, and filled with the kind of evocative turns of phrase that made me first fall in love with this man. This is my September record, but I’ll be listening to it all year. -Chris

mp3: The Tallest Man On Earth – Revelation Blues

7. Gossamer

by Passion Pit

[Columbia]

Gossamer is just the most fun you will have listening to an album… until you actually start paying attention to the lyrics. That moment hit me sometime during my umpteenth time listening to “Constant Conversations”. That song is DEVASTATING! However, you know how I love a devastating song (See: The Antlers; entire discography of…). That said, some moments made me laugh. The reference in “Carried Away” to all of the subject’s money being in copper, I don’t think we’re dealing with a commodity trader, we’re dealing with a poor sad-sack graduate student who had to use pennies to buy a can of refried beans. (I may be filling in some of the specifics from personal experience.) -Logan

mp3: Passion Pit – Carried Away

6. Transcendental Youth

by The Mountain Goats

[Merge]

John Darnielle has few peers in the world of music-making – in terms of both talent and sheer volume (that’s volume as in quantity of work, not necessarily decibels) – he is in a league all his own. He explores characters and place with a thoroughness and compassion usually reserved for the world of literature, but then somehow packages them into little 3-4 minute songs with desperately strummed guitar chords and heart-swelling choruses that demand to be listened to over and over again. In Transcendental Youth Darnielle returns to the world he inhabited in 2004’s We Shall All Be Healed, this time populated by a semi-fictionalized cast of characters all tied together by their various struggles with mental illness – and through his empathetic exploration of their demons he proceeds to exorcise some of our own. Woven through the record is Matthew E. White’s gorgeous horn arrangements, acting as the perfect counterpoint to Darnielle’s raggedy voice, possibly providing the transcendence referred to in the record’s title for the fallen youth of these songs. I can’t adequately express how much I’ve loved this record this year – “Cry For Judas” is as triumphant as anything Darnielle’s ever produced, “White Cedar” may be the most beautiful Mountain Goats song ever, etc. etc. – the only thing I can do is tell you to go listen to it – over and over and over until you feel the same way I do. That is, that John Darnielle is a national treasure. -Chris

mp3: The Mountain Goats – Cry for Judas

5. From The Top of Willamette Mountain

by Joshua James

[Intelligent Noise]

What would WiAC be without our usual fanboy enthusiasm for Joshua James? Well guys he’s back and better than ever. It almost seems unfair. The velvety smooth “Ghost in the Town” and “Sister” which just demands you clench your fists and scream-sing along with Joshua… it doesn’t seem fair to so many other musicians. Sorry guys, you want to write a thematic album that explores a man’s sincere search for spirituality? You can’t, it’s already been done. (Go ahead, count the ‘hallelujahs’ in From the Top… only the best can pull that off without me feeling like I’ve strayed uncomfortably into contemporary Christian music.) In the track “Willamette Mountain” Joshua sings, “I got a million more stories.” Let’s hope so. -Logan

mp3: Joshua James – Mystic

4. Tramp

by Sharon Van Etten

[Jagjaguwar]

This record has absolutely ruled my world all year. Since February it’s been on near constant rotation at our house, and its relatively low position on this list is simply a testament to how much great music we’ve listened to this year. Tramp profoundly delivers on the promise of Van Etten’s 2010 album, Epic, helped in no small part by Bryce Dessner’s brilliant production – expertly fleshing out the songs while never distracting from their real treasure: Van Etten’s way with words. The word “poet” is thrown around way too often when discussing songwriters, but in this case I can’t think of a better descriptor –her economy of word is breathtaking, somehow packing so much into so little, like the couplet from “Give Out” – “You’re the reason why I’ll move to the city / or why I’ll need to leave”. Tramp is full of moments like that: simple, straight-forward gut-checks that are at once profoundly personal, while also heartbreakingly relatable. -Chris

mp3: Sharon Van Etten – Give Out

3. I Know What Love Isn’t

by Jens Lekman

[Secretly Canadian]

“You don’t get over a broken heart / you just learn to carry it gracefully” sings Jens on “The World Moves On”, and in that simple phrase, Jens sums up the whole gist of this, his third album. It’s the break-up album that only Jens Lekman could have written – sad and beautiful and poignant, delivered with his wry sense of humor and acute self-awareness – never willing to give in to its own sadness or self-pity. It’s the kind of break-up album that acknowledges and affirms the heartbreak but is far more interested in trying to teach that heart how to “carry it gracefully”. In the song that bookends the record Jens searches for what that means in practical terms: “I started working out when we broke up / I can do one hundred push-ups / I could probably do two if I was bored” before he admits that “every little hair (still) knows your name”. But talking only about Jens’ lyrics is missing the whole point – because what makes Jens Lekman Jens Lekman is his ability to take sad songs and make them into something so ridiculous and beautiful that you can’t help but smile. In the past he’s done this masterfully for single songs at a time – probably the best example being “The Opposite of Hallelujah” from 2007’s Night Falls Over Kortedala, where Jens turns a conversation about debilitating depression into a heaven-reaching sing-a-long disco-anthem. Now take that and spread it over an entire album’s worth of heartbreak, and you’ll begin to understand how amazing this record is, and what it means to Jens Lekman to “carry it gracefully.” -Chris

mp3: Jens Lekman – I Know What Love Isn’t

2. 151a

by Kishi Bashi

[Joyful Noise]

I’ve been a Kishi Bashi missionary for the better part of the year now. As much as (SPOILER ALERT) Japandroids deserve the top spot, and for me it was perhaps the clearest choice for number one ever, Kishi Bashi was my go-to when someone asked about new music.  Share, share, share. “Manchester” this and “I Am the Antichrist to You” that. I never stopped talking about him (‘Him’ being Kaoru Ishibashi, aka Kishi Bashi). Did I feel betrayed when I heard “Bright Whites” on a commercial? Did I bemoan yet another gem of an artist having their beautiful work reduced to a ten second sound bite to sell HP printers? Heck no, just thrilled that perhaps Kishi Bashi is reaching more and more hearts.  So here I am again, sharing the most beautiful music of the year from a platform that reaches literally tens of people. -Logan

mp3: Kishi Bashi – Manchester

1. Celebration Rock

by Japandroids

[Polyvinyl]

Celebration Rock is an unbearably nostalgic record. Each track has a story and each story feels like it contains splinters of my own life. To explain, listening to “Younger Us” I had one story continually pop into my mind: It was 1 AM and it had been snowing all evening. I opened my sleeping roommate’s door and said, “Klompers, we’re all going sledding. Wanna come?” He sat up and still half-asleep said, “Let me get my coat and boots. I can dress in the car.” Hell ya Klompers, hell ya. Every track brings something back for me. They range from breakups to car rides to past introspective solitary moments (“Continuous Thunder”, “For the Love of Ivy”, and “Evil’s Sway” respectively) but each song resonates with me on a very individual level. I was reluctant to do this write up for that reason. My love of this album is very personal and I don’t think anything I’ve said translates to any of you. However, if you’re anything like me, you read the first sentence and the last sentence of these write ups and move on, so here goes. Hell ya Japandroids, hell ya. -Logan

mp3: Japandroids – Continuous Thunder

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

It’s been pretty quiet around here for awhile (so quiet that we’re pretty sure just our mom’s are checking this thing at this point) (hi moms!), but even though we haven’t been writing all that much, we promise we’ve still been listening to loads of good music. So putting this list together has been a good chance for us to finally put down how we feel about some of the great stuff we’ve heard this year. We just hope it’s as fun for you to browse through as it was for us to pull together!

Before reading on, just a quick note about a record that’s not on this list: The Head & The Heart’s debut record saw a major label release this year (on Sub Pop), and although we’ve probably listened to that absolute gem of a record more than just about any other this year, we didn’t include it on account of it being on our year-end list for 2010, since they self-released it that year. But just know this: under different circumstances, The Head & The Heart would most certainly top this list. So if you haven’t heard them yet, let that be your invitation! Because they are so great!

So with that out of the way, we’re ready to unveil our Top 21 Albums of 2011. Just remember that this list represents our favorite albums of the year, and not necessarily the best albums of the year. If we had to pick what we thought were the very best albums critically, this list might look a little different. But we’re not critics, so we’re not going to worry about who made the greatest artistic strides or whatever this year. These are simply our very favorite albums of the year: the ones that made us laugh, cry, dance, smile, press repeat, wet our pants, etc. Basically, this is what we’ll remember when we look back on 2011.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Here’s a short playlist I made a few weeks back after seeing The National open for Arcade Fire in Chicago (I promise to write something about that soon). It seems like there’s been a slew of one-off songs lately featuring the unearthly baritone of one of my favorite leading men, Matt Berninger, so I decided to throw all the ones I could find together.

They’re all varying degrees of awesome, but some stand out a titch more than others. The Forms song, for example, is hands-down one of my favorite songs of the year thus-far, while Matt’s duet with Sharon Jones over a Booker T groove is a very very close second. I also have a real soft spot for that Clogs tune. Enjoy!

mp3: The Forms – Fire To The Ground (featuring Matt Berninger)

mp3: Booker T – Representing Memphis (featuring Matt Berninger and Sharon Jones)

mp3: Doveman – Angel’s Share (featuring Matt Berninger)

mp3: Grinderman – Evil [Silver Alert Remix] (featuring Matt Berninger)

mp3: Clogs – Last Song (featuring Matt Berninger)

And if you’re enjoying Matt’s voice mingled with others, here’s some National songs featuring a few notable guest vocalists of their own:

mp3: The National – Sleep All Summer (featuring Annie Clark of St. Vincent)

mp3: The National – Think You Can Wait (featuring Sharon van Etten)

mp3: The National – Afraid of Everyone (featuring Sufjan Stevens)

And don’t forget, The National are releasing a special clear-vinyl 7″ of “Think You Can Wait” b/w “Exile Vilify” today! Get it here.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Last week (AKA: The Best Week Ever!), Kristin and I got ourselves a new little kitten, and per Logan’s suggestion, I’ve put together a short playlist to celebrate.

It’s made up of a songs about cats, some explicitly, and others not so much. Like the Mountain Goats song, for example, is pretty impressionistic in its suggestion of a feline, with lines like “in your arms, I am a wild creature” and “white carpet thick with pet hair”; while both The Weakerthans tracks actually follow the heartbreaking story of Virtute the cat, one of the single saddest tales ever told in song. Jason Collett’s “Little Tiger” is pretty specific for our little runt (see picture above), while Karen O’s song from Where the Wild Things Are is pretty universal in its evocation of kittens playing. And I couldn’t not include a Best Coast song (duh), much less the one with the infamous line, “I wish my cat could talk.” The other songs are just great and happen to have “cat” or “tiger” in the title. Enjoy!

mp3: The Head And The Heart – Cats and Dogs

mp3: The Weakerthans – Plea From A Cat Named Virtute

mp3: Jason Collett – Little Tiger

mp3: Rogue Wave – Catform

mp3: Karen O and the Kids – Rumpus

mp3: ARMS – Tiger Tamer

mp3: Best Coast – Goodbye

mp3: The Cure – The Lovecats

mp3: The Mountain Goats – Broom People

mp3: The Weakerthans – Virtute The Cat Explains Her Departure

[BONUS] And since we’re about 99.99% sure we’re naming the little guy “Elliot”, here’s a bonus track of Elliott Smith covering a Cat Stevens song:

mp3: Elliott Smith – Trouble (Cat Stevens cover)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Every year we talk about doing a “Favorite Songs” list, but we never do because it always ends up being so huge and unwieldy (we like a lot of music, alright?!). But this year we decided to just break down and do it, only here’s the catch: these are our Favorite Songs that DIDN’T appear on any of our Favorite Albums. So no matter how amazing “Cold War” or “Ambling Alp” or “We Used To Wait” might be, they won’t be on this list. Instead this gives us a chance to highlight a bunch of other fantastic artists who rocked our cubicle this year!

They’re in alphabetical order, and without any blurbs, so all you have to do is listen! Enjoy!

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Top 21? But weren’t there 25 last year? Well yes. And it was only 15 the year before that. In case you haven’t noticed, we’re not that rigid around here – all we really care about is letting you know what we’re loving right now and that’s about it. If we only fall for one record next year then you can probably expect “WiAC’s Top 1 Album of 2011”. It’ll be a good one, though. We promise.

That said, this year was a great year for music. But it was great in a different way than the last couple years. In 2008 and 2009 we fell hard for debut records by new bands (Grand Archives and Harlem Shakes, respectively), but this year our top 5 went to nearly all familiar faces. In fact, I think when we look back on 2010 what we’ll remember most was how artist after artist that released an anticipated album just seemed to deliver – and not just by making good records, but often by making the record of their career. In a year where we listened to more music than ever, we just couldn’t deny that these were the albums we enjoyed the most. Period.

Finally, remember that this list represents our favorite albums of the year, and not necessarily the best albums of the year. If we had to pick what we thought were the very best albums critically, this list would probably look a little different. But we’re not critics, so we’re going to skip all the posturing and taste-making mumbo-jumbo. These are simply our very favorite albums of the year – the ones that made us laugh, cry, dance, smile, press repeat, wet our pants, etc. Basically, this is what we’ll remember when we look back on 2010…

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sometimes my reading lists can be a bit on the heavy side. I’ve spent the last three months with my nose in books about nuclear missiles, submarines, shaky foreign relations, one-sided arms agreements, and things that could eventually result in the end of the world.

And what with the recent events in Korea and the “missile” sighting here in California, I figured a playlist is in order. Something to burn and place in your bomb shelter alongside canned goods and water.

mp3: Janelle Monae – Cold War

mp3: Andrew Bird – MX Missile

mp3: Morrissey – Everyday Is Like Sunday

mp3: Billy Joel – Leningrad

mp3: The Morning Benders – Cold War (Nice Clean Fight)

mp3: Andrew Bird – Scythian Empires

mp3: Bob Dylan – A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall

mp3: R.E.M. – Its the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)

And finally one more that has nothing to do with the Cold War, but was nonetheless the soundtrack of a video shared in class showing the accuracy of a Minuteman III missile.

mp3: Talk Talk – Its My Life

Tags: , , , , , , ,

To get ready for the All Hallow’s weekend here’s a playlist of what we think are genuinely creepy songs. With only a few exceptions, they’re mostly low-key acoustic songs, the kind you might hear around a campfire, somewhere far out in the woods. Only a couple deal with “monsters” per say (one mummy and one vampire, respectively), the rest are centered around the real-life kind of monsters – bloodthirsty sociopaths on hellish road-trips, spurned-lovers who become violently unhinged, and nightmarish butchers who come for your children in the night. A lot of the tunes are pretty, but if you listen close, these songs will keep you up at night…

mp3: Elliott Smith – Son of Sam

mp3: Blitzen Trapper – Black River Killer

mp3: The Decemberists – The Rake’s Song

mp3: Mason Jennings – Jackson Square

mp3: Bruce Springsteen – Nebraska

mp3: Josh Ritter – The Curse

mp3: Joshua James – Farmer From The West

mp3: Sufjan Stevens – John Wayne Gacy, Jr.

mp3: A.A. Bondy – Oh The Vampyre

mp3: Johnny Cash – Delia’s Gone

mp3: Kings of Leon – Joe’s Head

mp3: Okkervil River – For Real

mp3: The Decemberists – Shankill Butchers

mp3: Mason Jennings – Isabella Part II

mp3: Sun Kil Moon – Glenn Tipton

Also, on a less creepy note, here’s a Halloween-themed video for Jeremy Messersmith’s quite beautiful “A Girl, A Boy, and a Graveyard”. Happy Halloween!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

jrdawn500miles

Hey everyone! It’s hard to believe, but this is our 400th post here at WiAC. Kind of crazy, I know. And I couldn’t think of better news to grace this very historic post (not really), than the news that Josh Ritter just released a free song on his website – a cover of an old Hedy West song called “500 Miles” (no, not that 500 Miles). It’s pretty lo-fi, very pretty, and features Dawn Landes on vocals. Check it out:

Link: Josh Ritter & Dawn Landes – 500 Miles (Hedy West cover)

And because just a single link didn’t seem like a sufficient milestone post, here’s a few other Josh Ritter covers that I happen to love. Thanks for reading guys! Hope to see you all in 400 more!*

mp3: Josh Ritter – Blame It On The Tetons (Modest Mouse cover)

mp3: Josh Ritter – Mexican Home (John Prine cover)

mp3: Josh Ritter – Moon River (Johnny Mercer/Henry Mancini cover)

mp3: Josh Ritter & Sarah Harmer – Long May You Run (Neil Young cover)

mp3: Josh Ritter – Chelsea Hotel No. 2 (Leonard Cohen cover)

mp3: Josh Ritter – Daddy’s Little Pumpkin (John Prine cover) – live

mp3: Josh Ritter – The River (Bruce Springsteen cover) – live

mp3: Josh Ritter & Blake Hazard – Tonight You Belong to Me (Billy Rose/Lee David cover)

mp3: Bridget Matros & Josh Ritter – Angel From Montgomery (John Prine cover)

*actually “hope to see you” is pretty loose for “hope you’re still reading this little blog on the internet anonymously” – but that sounds a lot less pleasant…

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

shuffler

I’ve been really loving this new site called Shuffler.fm the past week or two. It’s kind of like Pandora, but instead of your music tastes going into an algorithm that predicts what you might like, it’s just keyed into various music blogs and spits out songs based on the genre you plug in – kind of like walking into a world-wide-web-sized independent record store. It’s way more random than most internet radio, and a whole lot of fun.

It definitely has some kinks to work out (the same Gillian Welch song came up for me 5 times in one sitting), but overall I’m really loving it. So I made a mix. About half of the songs below I found via Shuffler – either by groups I’d never heard of before (The Vaccines), or by groups I’d heard of but hadn’t given a chance yet (The Roadside Graves – holy cow, look for more on them soon). The rest is just some stuff I’ve been enjoying lately. Take a listen, then go try out Shuffler.fm for yourself.

mp3: The Vaccines – If You Wanna

mp3: Clean Equations – Buried Translations

mp3: First Aid Kit – Hard Believer

mp3: Icarus Himself – Digging Holes

mp3: Dax Riggs – Say Goodnight To The World

mp3: Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s – New York City Hotel Blues

mp3: Joey Kneiser – Adelina

mp3: Justin Townes Earle – Harlem River Blues

mp3: Abner Trio – You’re Gorgeous, Believe It!

mp3: The Roadside Graves – Liv Tyler

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

panda-bear-tomboy

I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s noticed this… but a lot of the artists who made records that rocked my world in 2007 have happened to also make records that are rocking my world in 2010. It’s like they’re on the same creative cycle or something. I thought I’d throw a few of them together for you:

mp3: Spoon – You Got Yr. Cherry Bomb (2007)

mp3: Spoon – Written In Reverse (2010)

mp3: LCD Soundsystem – North American Scum (2007)

mp3: LCD Soundsystem – Pow Pow (2010)

mp3: Josh Ritter – The Temptation Of Adam (2007)

mp3: Josh Ritter – The Curse (2010)

mp3: The National – Green Gloves (2007)

mp3: The National – Bloodbuzz Ohio (2010)

mp3: The New Pornographers – Challengers (2007)

mp3: The New Pornographers – If You Can’t See My Mirrors (2010)

mp3: Arcade Fire – Intervention (2007)

mp3: Arcade Fire – The Suburbs (2010)

mp3: Panda Bear – Comfy In Nautica (2007)

mp3: Panda Bear – Tomboy (2010)

So admittedly, those last two are a bit anticipatory – I’m only hoping that their new albums are as amazing as their 2007 counterparts… but I’m not too worried. Now we just need another record from Feist, The Moonbabies, and Radiohead (maybe!?) to round off my list…

Tags: , , , , , ,

amymillan_mastersoftheburial

This past month has been a little rough here in Las Vegas, where I attend dental school. This is the last semester I have of real intense bookwork… and because it’s the last one, the professors decided to end with a bang (13 exams in 5 days, with a few presentations thrown in for good measure). Needless to say, I spent a lot of time studying. The one thing that keeps me sane during those long nights in front of my computer screen is, as you would guess… music. Under normal circumstances, I can focus just fine listening to anything in my library. However, after very few hours of sleep for not so few days, I stick to the instrumental stuff. Lyrics seem to take my focus off of what I’m attempting to study/memorize sometimes. As I went about my studies there were a few songs in my all-instrumental “study mix” that were so good, they still grabbed my attention. I’ve decided to post a few. It’s a little different than the usual genres you see around here, but it’s good to expand your horizons, right?

mp3: Lang Lang – River Waltz
from the album The Painted Veil

mp3: John Williams – Doctor, Lawyer, Lutheran
from the album Catch Me If You Can

mp3: Ennio Morricone – The Mission
from the album The Mission

mp3: Yann Tiersen – Mother’s Journey
from the album Good bye Lenin!

mp3: Explosions In The Sky – Your Hand In Mine (With Strings)
from the album Friday Night Lights

mp3: Bjork – Overture
from the album Selmasongs

Tags: , , , , ,

« Older entries § Newer entries »